Associated Researchers

Clemson University Graduate Students 

Abigail Stephan

Abigail's CV

atsteph@g.clemson.edu

 

I am a doctoral candidate in the Learning Sciences program at Clemson University studying under the guidance of Dr. Faiza Jamil. Broadly, my research interests include intergenerational relationships and learning experiences in informal settings, such as the family and community. I am most interested in outcomes related to wellbeing and psychosocial development. I currently work as a graduate assistant for the General Engineering Learning Community (GELC), a program that supports first-year engineering students in their development of self-regulation and time management skills, effective learning strategies, and positive habits of mind. In addition to my work with the SHAARP Lab, I am a member of the Child Learning and Development (CLAD) Lab at Clemson.  

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Abigail Stephan

Ava McVey

Ava's CV

mcvey@g.clemson.edu

I am a graduate student in the Human Factors Psychology program at Clemson University. While my research interests vary, some of my favorite areas of study include topics within neuropsychology, cognitive neuroscience, developmental psychology, and of course human factors psychology. Specifically, I am most excited to work with Dr. Ross and the SHAARP lab in studying cognitive interventions and healthy aging. 

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Ava McVey

Penn State Graduate Students

Joanne Tian

Joanne's CV

jxt717@psu.edu

I am a graduate student in the Human Development and Family Studies program at Penn State working with Dr. Ross. My research interests focus on the cognitive functions in older adults, such as working memory and visual processing. Also, I am interested in how we can make interventions to help older adults improve their daily functions and slow down their cognitive decline. 

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Joanne Tian

Jordan D. Chamberlain

Jordan's CV

jdc80@psu.edu

I graduated from the University of Michigan in 2016 (B.S. Biopsychology, Cognition, and Neuroscience) and again in 2017 (M.S. Psychology: Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience). My undergraduate and Masters research focused largely on GABA concentrations and the discriminability of neural patterns in the visual cortex of younger and older adults. Currently, I am investigating age differences underlying neural patterns associated with true and false memories, and how white matter microstructural integrity relates to false memories in older adults. Through my collaborations across campus, I am exploring how subjective health factors become coupled with episodic memory in aging, as well as how we can improve older adults’ attentional processing through targeted cognitive interventions. In my spare time I enjoy reading, hiking, and exploring the local State College area.

Jordan D. Chamberlain