Associated Researchers

Graduate Students

Sara Freed

Sara's CV

sara.freed92@gmail.com

 

I am a graduate student in the Human Development and Family Studies graduate program at Penn State University working primarily with Dr. Ross. My broad research interest is in improving everyday function of older adults. Specifically, I am interested in identifying risk and protective factors for everyday and cognitive functioning in older adults, as well as interventions designed to target these factors. I am also interested in intervention design and implementation, and would like to explore creative delivery methods, including cognitive games and video games.

​​Sara Winter

Sara's CV

sow5180@psu.edu

After graduating from the University of Pittsburgh with my B.S. in Psychology in December 2015, I decided to pursue my PhD in Cognitive Psychology here at Penn State. Broadly, my research interests focus on how language ability changes as we age. Under the guidance of my advisor, Michele Diaz, PhD, my current work in the Language and Aging Lab explores the role of white matter in language production ability in both older and younger adults. I will also be working with my secondary mentor, Lesley Ross, PhD, in the SHAARP Lab to understand how physical and cognitive intervention programs could be leveraged to improve older adults' cognitive functioning.

Joanne Tian

Joanne's CV

jxt717@psu.edu

I am a graduate student in the Human Development and Family Studies program at Penn State working with Dr. Ross. My research interests focus on the cognitive functions in older adults, such as working memory and visual processing. Also, I am interested in how we can make interventions to help older adults improve their daily functions and slow down their cognitive decline. 

 

Jordan D. Chamberlain

Jordan's CV

jdc80@psu.edu

I graduated from the University of Michigan in 2016 (B.S. Biopsychology, Cognition, and Neuroscience) and again in 2017 (M.S. Psychology: Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience). My undergraduate and Masters research focused largely on GABA concentrations and the discriminability of neural patterns in the visual cortex of younger and older adults. Currently, I am investigating age differences underlying neural patterns associated with true and false memories, and how white matter microstructural integrity relates to false memories in older adults. Through my collaborations across campus, I am exploring how subjective health factors become coupled with episodic memory in aging, as well as how we can improve older adults’ attentional processing through targeted cognitive interventions. In my spare time I enjoy reading, hiking, and exploring the local State College area.

Sara Freed

Sara Winter

Joanne Tian

Jordan D. Chamberlain